Burn Them

Burn Them

* SENSITIVE CONTENT WARNING*

I am throwing up through my nostrils because I had one scoop of ice cream after dinner. It’s not pretty. I was once an ugly girl. I was oddly tall, chubby, and awkward for years. I still feel the repercussions everyday, and when I am being shallow, when I am obsessing over image, know that I am fighting the results of a society preoccupied with the sexualized female image. I have been fighting for years.

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Thoughts on David Harbour

Thoughts on David Harbour

On Monday, February 11th, actor David Harbour, widely-known for his role as Chief of Police Jim Hopper in Netflix’s popular Stranger Things, spoke at Birmingham-Southern (BSC) as the Alex P. Stirling guest lecturer. Audience members filled Bruno Great Hall, located on the third floor of the college’s Norton Campus Center. Media and Film Studies Professor Teddy Champion sat down and interviewed the actor on stage in talk-show fashion.

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BSC Hosts District Attorney Anthony Carr

BSC Hosts District Attorney Anthony Carr

This Thursday at 11:00 am, Carr will be giving a talk called “The Trials and Tribulations of Being the First.” Along with speaking about overcoming the odds of being raised by a single parent in a low-income area, Carr will give details about the journey to his election as well as his experiences thus far as District Attorney for the Birmingham division of the Jefferson County office.

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Churchill Comes to BSC

Churchill Comes to BSC

Birmingham-Southern College will become a destination for scholars of British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, thanks to a new archival collection that includes access to more than 800,000 pages of digitized original source material from Churchill’s own papers.

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Crocs are Back

Crocs are Back

The infamous brand was recently brought back into the spotlight amid rumors that the company is going out of business. These rumors are false.

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Lessons and Carols

Lessons and Carols

Lessons and Carols, a beloved BSC tradition in its 82nd year, will be taking place on December 2nd at 4:30 pm at Canterbury United Methodist Church. Not only does this event count as a culture credit, but it is also a wonderful way to take a break from the stress of upcoming finals and kick off the Christmas season! For Freshman Concert Choir member Maria Potts, this service will be especially meaningful because it will be her first time to join in on a family tradition. Maria’s parents, Daniel and Ellen (Woodward) Potts (class of 1988) and her older sister Julie Potts (class of 2018) will be performing with the alumni choir, and Maria is eager to continue the family legacy.

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Plein Eau Exhibition this November

Plein Eau Exhibition this November

On November 9-28, The Durbin Gallery at Birmingham-Southern College will feature the work of accomplished artist Michael Lennicx ’97 in an exhibition entitled “Plein Eau.” Lennicx is an acclaimed American artist and creator. His mediums range from fine art, conceptualism, and illustration to animation and functional design. His handiwork has been seen in more than 40 different titles in the television, film, and game industry, including multiple Emmy Award-winning shows. He graduated from BSC with a bachelor of fine arts degree and is now self-employed.

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Q & A with Author Abbey Lenzie

Q & A with Author Abbey Lenzie

On November the 8th at 3:30 in Harbert Auditorium, Birmingham-Southern (BSC) graduate will be speaking about her recently published, award-winning novella, In the Desert. Abbey Lenzie (class of 2013) majored in Media and Film Studies and minored in creative writing. Her novella recently won the 2018 Plaza Literary Prize. Before coming to her event on Thursday, Bagheera asked her a few questions.

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The Threat of Insta-Poets

The Threat of Insta-Poets

American poets watch as poetry-book sales dwindle and the entire state of fine arts seems to face the threat of dilapidation. In 1988, Joseph Epstein released his deep-cutting criticism on poetry through an essay titled “Who Killed Poetry?” While Epstein laid the blame on the shoulders of the poets of his generation, any modern-day poet is likely to blame a decreasing poetry market-place. In 2006, D.W. Fenza offered his own response to Epstein’s criticism with an article he called, “Who Keeps Killing Poetry?” Fenza claims poetry has become “a market-model formula” of sellers and consumers.

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