Hope Tucker

#HoustonStrong

Hope Tucker
#HoustonStrong

A Symbol of Reunion After Hurricane Harvey

 A child's drawing found in the rubble in Kingwood, TX.  Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

A child's drawing found in the rubble in Kingwood, TX. Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

Children’s drawings are the windows to their minds—the embodiment of innocence. Many children draw pictures of their families, usually holding hands in front of their homes. Most of these images do not include their families in lifeboats or traces of water damage, besides the occasional splotch of spilt juice. These drawings are often displayed on refrigerators for their loved ones to admire, not resting on piles of rubble in demolished neighborhoods.

This scene seems surreal to those of us who have never known it. We hear about natural disasters happening all over the world, but when one happens so close to home, we are taken by surprise. It takes real experience to even comprehend, but, since Hurricane Harvey struck Houston, Texas and surrounding areas, this has been a reality for thousands of people.  

On August 28th, Ashley Raggio of Kingwood, Texas, was ready to begin her freshman year at Lone Star College-Kingwood when devastating floodwaters delayed this exciting time in her life.

 Hurrican Harvey now holds the record (51 inches) for single-storm tropical rainfall in the U.S.  Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

Hurrican Harvey now holds the record (51 inches) for single-storm tropical rainfall in the U.S. Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

“I honestly don’t know what to say. [August 30th] was the first day everyone was able to get out and start recovering,” said Raggio. “The community has come together and gotten immediate needs like clothing, toiletries, etc.”     

From everywhere in the United States, people are coming together to send supplies, thoughts or prayers, and kind words to the city of Houston. In Birmingham, Mayor Bell initiated a five-day supply drive at Boutwell Auditorium. On the Hilltop, we made UMCOR relief kits with cleaning supplies that could be taken to the drop-off center in the Krulak Institute.

“Above all, please, please, please pray for us,” Raggio pleaded. “We are in it for the long run as far as getting our city back to normal. We are devastated and are in survival mode.”

 Neighbors come together in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.  Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

Neighbors come together in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Photos courtesy of Ashley Raggio, Chad Raggio, and Preston Miller.

This is true determination realizing that hard times are ahead, but refusing to give up. Houston may be in it for the long run, but they are not alone. Families rebuilding homes and lives need help. Below are some links provided by Ashley Raggio for more information regarding how BSC students and faculty can donate to help those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

https://www.wc.org/hurricane/
https://www.umcor.org/UMCOR/Relief-Supplies/Relief-Supply-Kits/Cleaning
https://www.convoyofhope.org
https://giving.onthecity.org/gracechurchlive/uauth_giving/new

Feature photo by araza123 via Flickr

is a junior English major at BSC. She edits for Bagheera and Quad Literary Magazine. When she is not writing or editing, she plays violin in her family band.